McPherson E.G., Simpson J.R., 2003 “Potential energy savings in buildings by an urban tree planting programme in California” Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 2(2): 73-86(14), DOI: 10.1078/1618-8667-00025
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Davis, CA
Location: California, USA

The ~177.3 million energy-conserving trees in California should reduce the amount of energy used for air conditioning by in a single year by 2.5% (saving US$485.8 million), and save utilities 10% (US$778.5 million) annually. If 50 million trees were planted, over a 15-year period each tree would save US$71, while the cost of planting and protecting each tree is only US$50.

Johnson A.D., Gerhold H.D. 2003 “Carbon storage by urban tree cultivars, in roots and above-ground”, Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 2(2): 65-72(8), DOI: 10.1078/1618-8667-00024
Southern University and A&M College – CAFCS, LA
Pennsylvania State University, PA
Location: ?, USA

The average amount of carbon stored in nursery or recently transplanted Juneberry, Apple, Pear, and Lilac cultivars was measured. Smaller trees (3.8-6.4 cm diameter at breast height) stored 0.3-1.0 kg carbon in the roots, and 1.7-3.6 kg in total. Larger trees (14.0-19.7 cm dbh) stored 10.4 kg+ in the roots, and 54.5 kg in total.

Juneberry – Amelenchier spp.
Apple – Malus spp.
Pear – Pyrus spp.
Lilac – Syringa spp.

Nowak D.J., Kuroda M., Crane D.E. 2004 “Tree mortality rates and tree population projections in Baltimore, Maryland, USA” Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 2(3): 139-147(9), DOI: 10.1078/1618-8667-00030
USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station, NY
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, NY
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, USA

In Baltimore, 6.6% of trees die annually, with an annual decrease in the number of trees of 4.2%. Particularly high mortality rates are seen on sites used for transportation, and commercial and industrial areas, whereas residential areas have relatively few tree deaths. Urban forestry in Baltimore is projected to decline.

Solfjeld I., Hansen O.B. 2004 “Post-transplant growth of five deciduous ordic tree species as affected by transplanting date and root pruning” Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 2(3): 129-137(9), DOI: 10.1078/1618-8667-00029
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural University of Norway
Location: Norway

Transplanting was followed by a reduction in growth in four deciduous tree species in Norway, but not in Rowan. After one season, Norway Maple, Horse Chestnut, Wild Cherry and and Common Lime ‘Pallida’ had shoot growth reduced by 38-86%, and leaf surface area by 13-61%. In the second season, shoot growth was reduced in Norway Maple by 71% and by 81% in Horse Chestnut, which did not return to normal growth in the third season.

Common Lime ‘Pallida’ – Tilia x europaea L. ‘Pallida’
Horse Chestnut – Aesculus hippocastanum L.
Norway Maple – Acer platanoides L.
Rowan – Sorbus aucuparia L.
Wild Cherry – Prunus avium L.