Journal: Basic and Applied Ecology
Location: Hainich, Germany

In Hainich National Park, and old-growth forest in Germany, leaves in the upper canopy of eight tree species varied in size from 12.9 to 19.4 m2 per kg, were covered in 125 to 313 stomata per mm, contained 95-175mol Nitrogen per m2, and had a delta 13C value (the degree of carbon enrichment compared to inorganic matter, the more negative the higher), of -27.81 to -25.85 parts per thousand (typical of C3 photosynthesis). Sycamore, Hornbeam, Ash, and Linden saplings had a maximum CO2 assimilation rate (Amax, indicating photosynthetic rate) of 5.0 and 6.4 mumol m–2s–1. Adult Hornbeams had the lowest Amax (10.5), and Ash the highest (16.3). Lower canopy Ash also had the highest Amax (12.0, compared to 5.0-5.6).

Sycamore – Acer pseudoplatanus
Hornbeam – Carpinus betulus
Ash – Fraxinus Excelsior
Linden – Tilia platyphyllos

Hölscher D, 2004. “Leaf traits and photosynthetic parameters of saplings and adult trees of co-existing species in a temperate broad-leaved forest.” Basic and Applied Ecology, 5(2): 163-172, DOI: 10.1078/1439-1791-00218
Affiliations: University of Göttingen

Journal: Basic and Applied Ecology
Location: Boreal Sweden

In 30 managed forests (180ha in total) in boreal Sweden surveyed before harvest, 33 red list bryophyte and lichen species (35% of all red list species that have been observed in that part of Sweden) were found, ranging from 5 to 16 species per stand (10 on average), or 6 per hectare. This is more frequent than in designated hot-spot areas. 51% of species were growing on dead trees, and 48% on live. Mature managed forests may be important habitats for red list bryophyte and lichen species.

Gustafsson L, Appelgren L, Jonsson F, Nordin U, Persson AA, Weslien J-O, 2004. “High occurrence of red-listed bryophytes and lichens in mature managed forests in boreal Sweden” Basic and Applied Ecology, Volume 5(2): 123-129, DOI: 10.1078/1439-1791-00223.
Affiliations: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Vänersborg, Trångsviken, The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden (Skogforsk)