Journal: Basic and Applied Ecology
Location: Europe (Switzerland?)

When 50% of the leaf area of Canadian Goldenrod was removed by clipping, plants were 11.9% shorter up to 20 days, but 13.5% taller 42 to 138 after clipping began, so clipped plants were not shorter overall. However, they did have 12.2% thinner stems, and flowers had 43.2% less mass. When the plants were sprayed with jasmonic acid (a plant hormone that disturbs insect digestion and thus protects the plant from being eaten), the internodes (length between nodes) were 14.7% shorter, leaf area was reduced by 4.6%, it took 4.4 more days to flower, and flowers had 32.2% less mass than unsprayed plants.

Canadian Goldenrod – Solidago canadensis

van Kleunen M, Ramponi G, Schmid B, 2004. “Effects of herbivory simulated by clipping and jasmonic acid on Solidago canadensis.” Basic and Applied Ecology 5(2): 173-181, DOI: 10.1078/1439-1791-00225
Affiliations: Universität Zürich

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Journal: Basic and Applied Ecology
Location: Hainich, Germany

In Hainich National Park, and old-growth forest in Germany, leaves in the upper canopy of eight tree species varied in size from 12.9 to 19.4 m2 per kg, were covered in 125 to 313 stomata per mm, contained 95-175mol Nitrogen per m2, and had a delta 13C value (the degree of carbon enrichment compared to inorganic matter, the more negative the higher), of -27.81 to -25.85 parts per thousand (typical of C3 photosynthesis). Sycamore, Hornbeam, Ash, and Linden saplings had a maximum CO2 assimilation rate (Amax, indicating photosynthetic rate) of 5.0 and 6.4 mumol m–2s–1. Adult Hornbeams had the lowest Amax (10.5), and Ash the highest (16.3). Lower canopy Ash also had the highest Amax (12.0, compared to 5.0-5.6).

Sycamore – Acer pseudoplatanus
Hornbeam – Carpinus betulus
Ash – Fraxinus Excelsior
Linden – Tilia platyphyllos

Hölscher D, 2004. “Leaf traits and photosynthetic parameters of saplings and adult trees of co-existing species in a temperate broad-leaved forest.” Basic and Applied Ecology, 5(2): 163-172, DOI: 10.1078/1439-1791-00218
Affiliations: University of Göttingen