Journal: Fisheries Management and Ecology
Location: Salt River watershed, Wyoming and Idaho, USA

Adult cutthroat trout in the Salt River watershed were tracked from September-October 2005 until August 2006 using implanted radio transmitters. The fish were caught in the main river stem, spent October-March largely sedentery in pools, started to move more in April and then increased May-June for the spawning season, when 44% of the 43 fish remained in Salt River in April 2006, 37% moved to mountain streams, and 19% into spring streams, almost all preferring streams with manmade pools and gravel-cobble riffles. The fish didn’t use streams that dewatered in the summer or were blocked by manmade barriers.

Cutthroat Trout – Oncorhynchus clarkii

Sanderson TB, Hubert WA, 2009. “Movements by adult cutthroat trout in a lotic system: implications for watershed-scale management” Fisheries Management and Ecology, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2400.2009.00669.x

Affiliations: USGS, Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit.

Advertisements

Journal:Fisheries Management and Ecology
Location: England and Wales, UK

In 2004 and 2005, 187 fish kills were investigated in lake fisheries in England and Wales, predominantly stocked with Common Carp. The fish kills largely occurred in Spring (April – June) in lakes with high stocking densities (>1500 kg ha−1), a uniform habitat, and few aquatic shore plants (macrophytes). Mortality was mainly from parasitic infections (White Spot, Chilodonella species, Ichthyobodo necator, and Fish Lice) and ulcerative diseases caused by infection with the bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida, and secondary bacterial infections of other Aeromonas and Pseudomonas bacteria. Recent stocking was linked to Carp fish kills.

Common Carp – Cyprinus carpio
White Spot – Ichthyophthirius multifiliis
Fish Louse – Argulus sp.

Hewlett NR, Snow J, Britton JR, 2009. “The role of management practices in fish kills in recreational lake fisheries in England and Wales” Fisheries Management and Ecology, 16(3): 248 – 254, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2400.2009.00671.x

Affiliations: Environment Agency, UK
Bournemouth University, UK

Journal: African Journal of Ecology
Location: Gulf of Gabès, Tunisia

Of 612 Mediterranean Killifish caught in the Gulf of Gabès, Tunisia, 54 (8.8%) had deformed spines, and were 8 times more likely to be deformed when from polluted areas. Deformities occurred less frequently as size increased, more often in fish under 25mm long.

Mediterranean Killifish: Aphanius fasciatus

Messaoudi I, Kessabi K, Kacem A, Saïd K, 2009. “Incidence of spinal deformities in natural populations of Aphanius fasciatus Nardo, 1827 from the Gulf of Gabes, Tunisia.” Africal Journal of Ecology, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2028.2008.00972.x
Affiliations: ISBM (Institut Superieur de Biotechnologie de Monastir)