Journal: African Journal of Ecology
Location: Serengeti, Tanzania

In the Tanzanian Serengeti, several female ostriches contribute their clutch to the same nest, with each nest containing up to 38 eggs. Eggs were laid sooner in the western low-altitude area than in the eastern uplands.

Ostrich – Struthio camelus

Magige FJ, Stokke BG, Sortland R, Røskaft E, 2009. “Breeding biology of ostriches (Struthio camelus) in the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania.” DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2028.2008.01002.x
Affiliations: University of Dar es Salaam, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Journal: Basic and Applied Ecology
Location: Hainich, Germany

In Hainich National Park, and old-growth forest in Germany, leaves in the upper canopy of eight tree species varied in size from 12.9 to 19.4 m2 per kg, were covered in 125 to 313 stomata per mm, contained 95-175mol Nitrogen per m2, and had a delta 13C value (the degree of carbon enrichment compared to inorganic matter, the more negative the higher), of -27.81 to -25.85 parts per thousand (typical of C3 photosynthesis). Sycamore, Hornbeam, Ash, and Linden saplings had a maximum CO2 assimilation rate (Amax, indicating photosynthetic rate) of 5.0 and 6.4 mumol m–2s–1. Adult Hornbeams had the lowest Amax (10.5), and Ash the highest (16.3). Lower canopy Ash also had the highest Amax (12.0, compared to 5.0-5.6).

Sycamore – Acer pseudoplatanus
Hornbeam – Carpinus betulus
Ash – Fraxinus Excelsior
Linden – Tilia platyphyllos

Hölscher D, 2004. “Leaf traits and photosynthetic parameters of saplings and adult trees of co-existing species in a temperate broad-leaved forest.” Basic and Applied Ecology, 5(2): 163-172, DOI: 10.1078/1439-1791-00218
Affiliations: University of Göttingen

Nowak D.J., Kuroda M., Crane D.E. 2004 “Tree mortality rates and tree population projections in Baltimore, Maryland, USA” Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 2(3): 139-147(9), DOI: 10.1078/1618-8667-00030
USDA Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station, NY
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, NY
Location: Baltimore, Maryland, USA

In Baltimore, 6.6% of trees die annually, with an annual decrease in the number of trees of 4.2%. Particularly high mortality rates are seen on sites used for transportation, and commercial and industrial areas, whereas residential areas have relatively few tree deaths. Urban forestry in Baltimore is projected to decline.

Solfjeld I., Hansen O.B. 2004 “Post-transplant growth of five deciduous ordic tree species as affected by transplanting date and root pruning” Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 2(3): 129-137(9), DOI: 10.1078/1618-8667-00029
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural University of Norway
Location: Norway

Transplanting was followed by a reduction in growth in four deciduous tree species in Norway, but not in Rowan. After one season, Norway Maple, Horse Chestnut, Wild Cherry and and Common Lime ‘Pallida’ had shoot growth reduced by 38-86%, and leaf surface area by 13-61%. In the second season, shoot growth was reduced in Norway Maple by 71% and by 81% in Horse Chestnut, which did not return to normal growth in the third season.

Common Lime ‘Pallida’ – Tilia x europaea L. ‘Pallida’
Horse Chestnut – Aesculus hippocastanum L.
Norway Maple – Acer platanoides L.
Rowan – Sorbus aucuparia L.
Wild Cherry – Prunus avium L.