Journal: Basic and Applied Ecology
Location: Glasshouse experiment, Germany?

When tomatoes were inoculated with the fungal endophyte Acremonium strictum, only 20% of Cotton Bollworm caterpillars survived to adulthood, compared to 54.5% on uninoculated tomatoes, although they still ate the same quantity of leaves.

Tomatoes – Lycopersicum esculentum
Cotton Bollworm – Helicoverpa armigera

Jallow MF, Dugassa-Gobena D, Vidal S, 2004. “Indirect interaction between an unspecialized endophytic fungus and a polyphagous moth.” Basic and Applied Ecology, 5(2): 183-191, DOI: 10.1078/1439-1791-00224
Affiliations: Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

Journal: Basic and Applied Ecology
Location: Hainich, Germany

In Hainich National Park, and old-growth forest in Germany, leaves in the upper canopy of eight tree species varied in size from 12.9 to 19.4 m2 per kg, were covered in 125 to 313 stomata per mm, contained 95-175mol Nitrogen per m2, and had a delta 13C value (the degree of carbon enrichment compared to inorganic matter, the more negative the higher), of -27.81 to -25.85 parts per thousand (typical of C3 photosynthesis). Sycamore, Hornbeam, Ash, and Linden saplings had a maximum CO2 assimilation rate (Amax, indicating photosynthetic rate) of 5.0 and 6.4 mumol m–2s–1. Adult Hornbeams had the lowest Amax (10.5), and Ash the highest (16.3). Lower canopy Ash also had the highest Amax (12.0, compared to 5.0-5.6).

Sycamore – Acer pseudoplatanus
Hornbeam – Carpinus betulus
Ash – Fraxinus Excelsior
Linden – Tilia platyphyllos

Hölscher D, 2004. “Leaf traits and photosynthetic parameters of saplings and adult trees of co-existing species in a temperate broad-leaved forest.” Basic and Applied Ecology, 5(2): 163-172, DOI: 10.1078/1439-1791-00218
Affiliations: University of Göttingen